Play dough

Below are sheets and example photos for activities used in our Royal Society of Chemistry funded ‘Play dough’ workshops. More will be added as the year goes on, and eventually we’ll have a toolkit for running a session…

RSC_LOGO_SUPPORTED_WEB

Please feel free to use these for non-commercial purposes only* if you wish (but please don’t modify the sheets!). If you could let me know how you’ve used them, that would be great!

Parents/carers are entirely responsible for deciding whether or not activities are suitable for their children  – all activities are designed to be parent/carer led so please exercise common sense, observe all usual safety precautions (e.g. avoid choking/strangulation/drowning/suffocation/poisoning risks, don’t allow children to eat materials, never leave children unattended with resources) and protect against mess as necessary.

Cold foam

Cold foam

A mixture of bicarbonate of soda and shaving foam that always feels cold!

Cloud dough

Cloud dough

This is just flour and oil. Wholemeal flour was used to make the dough in the picture, giving it its brown colour. If you’d like white dough, use white flour.

Fizzy play dough

Fizzy play dough

Use a chemical reaction between baking ingredients to get bubbles in your play dough!

Flour and water sticky play

Flour and water sticky play

Mix flour and water to form sticky dough and explore its texture and behaviour.

Flour doodles

Flour doodles

Compare dry flour to wet, develop mark making skills and when you’re finished, give the tray a shake and start all over again!

Play dough

Play dough

A simple recipe to make this versatile dough that can be used for learning about colour mixing, textures, changing materials, imaginative play and more.

Snow dough

Snow dough

This is a lovely sensory experience and can also be shaped and crumbled just like snow.

 

Some of these activities were originally developed at Heron Corn Mill, with support from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Heron Mill Logo 2013

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